LET'S LIVE LONGER

Work out, stay fitter
Regular exercise keeps the heart ticking, prevents Type-2 diabetes, maintains and builds muscle mass, keeps up energy levels, and also elevates mood in a big way. It has been found that moderate low-impact exercise is the best solution to a long life. Small lifestyle changes like walking/cycling to your nearby destinations for chores, taking stairs, doing household chores, and gardening can go a long way towards prolonging your life. This is what Buettner calls “deconveniencing your home”!
Gardening is one of the few ways of getting exercise in a pleasurable way. It helps develop a nurturing attitude towards nature. Plus, being out in the sun gives a good dose of vitamin D. The benefit of reaping fresh produce from your own garden is quite unbeatable.
Yoga has been propounded as a tool for longevity since centuries. It is low on impact, but high on strengthening the muscles and ligaments, leading to more flexibility as we age. A loss of muscle mass, accompanied by a gain in fat mass, occurs with ageing. Yoga is great for longevity because it strengthens the muscles and ligaments that surround bones and joints without putting pressure on them. Movements become more fluid and less stiff overtime.
T’ai Chi, the Chinese art of choreographed meditative exercises, has been around for centuries. It is not only enjoyable, but also can be performed at any age. When practised for 30 minutes, thrice a week, it helps improve energy and balance, strengthen immunity, reduce stress, better sleep, and keep the body flexible.
Eat better, live longer
There’s plenty of truth in this old adage — “We dig our graves with our teeth.” We are what we eat, so it is no surprise that our diet plays a vital role in how we age. A research done on the centenarians in Japan and China revealed that they ate mostly fish, vegetables, mushrooms, seaweed, corn, buckwheat, and hardly any meat. Scientists have proven the health benefits of eating a plant-rich, meat-free diet. These geriatrics rarely suffered from heart or liver disease, cancer or degenerative diseases.
Dan Buettner [author of The Blue Zones, a book on longevity] recommends that you donate all the large plates in your kitchen and replace them with smaller plates. This will automatically reduce calorie intake by 30 per cent at least at dinner times.
Eating locally produced organic food is an added advantage. Sardinians swear by red wine as one of the aids to defy ageing, given that red wine is rich in antioxidants, it might as well be true. Drinking enough pure water through the day is also an important part of keeping cells healthy. Herbs and spices like turmeric, ginger, garlic, and pepper have several disease-preventing properties that one could benefit from.
Here are some foods that will help you lead a long healthy life:
Whole grains reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and some cancers [whole wheat flour, ragi, oatmeal, jowar, bajra, cracked wheat, buckwheat, and cornmeal]
Calcium-rich dairy foods prevent osteoporosis [low-fat milk, dahi, low-fat paneer, and cheese]
Protein from beans and lean meats result in stronger muscles and improved metabolism [dried beans, nuts, and fish]
Fruits provide antioxidants and a variety of vitamins [choose a variety of colours]
Vegetables help reduce the risk of some chronic diseases by providing vital nutrients [green leafy, orange coloured and starchy vegetables].
Grow older, think sharper
Age brings along senility, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s. These can be delayed or prevented altogether. Daily brain workouts like puzzles, chess and sudoku, and a diet rich in essential amino acids, omega-3 and vitamins ensure that you have a razor sharp brain for many years to come.
The following list of foods will keep your brain buzzing for long:
Omega-3 rich fish: Salmon, mackerel and sardines
Nuts and seeds: They are rich in omega-3 and protein
Antioxidant-rich foods: Berries and green tea [2 cups a day]
Choline-rich food: Cruciferous vegetables [cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli], eggs, peanuts, and rajma
Monounsaturated fats: Olive oil, peanuts, sesame oil, flaxseeds and fish oil
Microalgae: Spirulina and seaweed.
Beat stress, live lighter
Follow these simple steps to de-stress
Bond with family and friends
Cut out stimulants like caffeine
Cultivate a hobby and join a hobby group
De-clutter with a passion. Give away anything that you haven’t used for six months
Keep free slots in your daily planner for relaxation, or doing what makes you happy, including doing nothing
Laugh like a child
Give importance to a good night’s sleep
Get a pet. A pet dog can bring you much happiness.
To live a long life full of vitality, you can start at any point, making small changes one at a time to improve for the better. Pursue longevity with a passion, and you will realise that it is not some elusive Holy Grail, but something very much attainable.

EAT MORE SUGAR…AND FIND YOURSELF LOOK OLDER

How dangerous liberal intake of sugar is already well known among health-conscious people. Diabetes type 2,obesity, bla bla bla and the list goes on. Yeah right, the list goes on. Now, it’s for youto reconsider how much sugar you’re gonna eat today..However, sugar has another VERY unwanted side-effect – it makes you look old before your time!
That’s according to Yahoo’s ‘Skin Guru’ Dr. Leslie Bauman.
I’m no expert in skin care, but I think the explanation is fairly easy to understand. She says…
“Sugar triggers a natural process called glycation, which is the same chemical reaction that turns meat brown when you cook it. The sugars bind with tissues to form harmful molecules, called advanced glycation end products (ironically known as AGEs), which damage elastin and collagen — two substances your skin needs to stay supple and elastic. AGEs also damage the kidneys, brain and other essential organs.”
So it would appear that a high-sugar intake damages elastin and collagen – that’s bad news.
It’s humorous, but also tragic, to watch television commercials marketed at women. One advert will sell the latest must-have skin cream to ‘Defy Aging‘. This is followed by an ad for the latest low-fat ice cream, low-fat cereal bar, low-fat chocolate bars (and on and on and on…..) – all LOADED with sugar.
Their message is clear: Keep your skin looking young with miracle creams, AND, easily control your weight with low-fat, and therefore healthy, products – yeah right!
The unsuspecting female population remains unaware that the 2 advertised products are actually working AGAINST each other.
Not that this only affects women. We live in a time where it’s OK for men to care about how they look, watch what they eat, and even use some cosmetic products if they wish. Aren’t we? It isn’t just me, is it? .
Anyway, Dr.Baumann goes on to say..
“And it’s not just the obvious culprits, like soda and candy, that cause damage; other foods with a high glycemic index, like white bread, pasta and potatoes also cause the formation of AGEs, because they are quickly converted to sugar in the bloodstream.”
I think the REAL message is this: get on a healthy diet that stabilizes your blood sugar – and do it as soon as possible! You’ll:
Be leaner
Have more energy
Have a better lipid profile
Stay looking younger for longer…
…to name but a few. If you don’t enjoy low-carb diets, a low Glycemic Load diet is what you need

LET'S LIVE LONGER

Work out, stay fitter
Regular exercise keeps the heart ticking, prevents Type-2 diabetes, maintains and builds muscle mass, keeps up energy levels, and also elevates mood in a big way. It has been found that moderate low-impact exercise is the best solution to a long life. Small lifestyle changes like walking/cycling to your nearby destinations for chores, taking stairs, doing household chores, and gardening can go a long way towards prolonging your life. This is what Buettner calls “deconveniencing your home”!
Gardening is one of the few ways of getting exercise in a pleasurable way. It helps develop a nurturing attitude towards nature. Plus, being out in the sun gives a good dose of vitamin D. The benefit of reaping fresh produce from your own garden is quite unbeatable.
Yoga has been propounded as a tool for longevity since centuries. It is low on impact, but high on strengthening the muscles and ligaments, leading to more flexibility as we age. A loss of muscle mass, accompanied by a gain in fat mass, occurs with ageing. Yoga is great for longevity because it strengthens the muscles and ligaments that surround bones and joints without putting pressure on them. Movements become more fluid and less stiff overtime.
T’ai Chi, the Chinese art of choreographed meditative exercises, has been around for centuries. It is not only enjoyable, but also can be performed at any age. When practised for 30 minutes, thrice a week, it helps improve energy and balance, strengthen immunity, reduce stress, better sleep, and keep the body flexible.
Eat better, live longer
There’s plenty of truth in this old adage — “We dig our graves with our teeth.” We are what we eat, so it is no surprise that our diet plays a vital role in how we age. A research done on the centenarians in Japan and China revealed that they ate mostly fish, vegetables, mushrooms, seaweed, corn, buckwheat, and hardly any meat. Scientists have proven the health benefits of eating a plant-rich, meat-free diet. These geriatrics rarely suffered from heart or liver disease, cancer or degenerative diseases.
Dan Buettner [author of The Blue Zones, a book on longevity] recommends that you donate all the large plates in your kitchen and replace them with smaller plates. This will automatically reduce calorie intake by 30 per cent at least at dinner times.
Eating locally produced organic food is an added advantage. Sardinians swear by red wine as one of the aids to defy ageing, given that red wine is rich in antioxidants, it might as well be true. Drinking enough pure water through the day is also an important part of keeping cells healthy. Herbs and spices like turmeric, ginger, garlic, and pepper have several disease-preventing properties that one could benefit from.
Here are some foods that will help you lead a long healthy life:
Whole grains reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and some cancers [whole wheat flour, ragi, oatmeal, jowar, bajra, cracked wheat, buckwheat, and cornmeal]
Calcium-rich dairy foods prevent osteoporosis [low-fat milk, dahi, low-fat paneer, and cheese]
Protein from beans and lean meats result in stronger muscles and improved metabolism [dried beans, nuts, and fish]
Fruits provide antioxidants and a variety of vitamins [choose a variety of colours]
Vegetables help reduce the risk of some chronic diseases by providing vital nutrients [green leafy, orange coloured and starchy vegetables].
Grow older, think sharper
Age brings along senility, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s. These can be delayed or prevented altogether. Daily brain workouts like puzzles, chess and sudoku, and a diet rich in essential amino acids, omega-3 and vitamins ensure that you have a razor sharp brain for many years to come.
The following list of foods will keep your brain buzzing for long:
Omega-3 rich fish: Salmon, mackerel and sardines
Nuts and seeds: They are rich in omega-3 and protein
Antioxidant-rich foods: Berries and green tea [2 cups a day]
Choline-rich food: Cruciferous vegetables [cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli], eggs, peanuts, and rajma
Monounsaturated fats: Olive oil, peanuts, sesame oil, flaxseeds and fish oil
Microalgae: Spirulina and seaweed.
Beat stress, live lighter
Follow these simple steps to de-stress
Bond with family and friends
Cut out stimulants like caffeine
Cultivate a hobby and join a hobby group
De-clutter with a passion. Give away anything that you haven’t used for six months
Keep free slots in your daily planner for relaxation, or doing what makes you happy, including doing nothing
Laugh like a child
Give importance to a good night’s sleep
Get a pet. A pet dog can bring you much happiness.
To live a long life full of vitality, you can start at any point, making small changes one at a time to improve for the better. Pursue longevity with a passion, and you will realise that it is not some elusive Holy Grail, but something very much attainable.

INDONESIA,KEEP IT UP!!!

Hopefully it comes as no great surprise to you that deforestation is a major problem in many areas of the world, both it terms of preserving biodiversity and preventing climate change — some countries are chopping down their forests at astonishing rates. But what you may not know is which nations really have the highest rates of deforestation, so here they are:
When considering all these, for sake of comparison, even though Brazil gets a lot of the heat for Amazonian deforestation — and rightly so, considering the total area of land cleared — as a percentage of landmass cleared it isn’t even in the the top twenty. Over the past twenty years or so the deforestation rate has been 8% and over 70% of historic forest cover remains.
NOTE: All the data in this post has been derived from the truly informative and well presented Google Earth layer on deforestation, created by David Tryse, which draws its data from the World Resources Institute and Greenpeace. All percentages refer to the years 1990-2005.
1) Honduras: -37%Historically Honduras was pretty much entirely covered by trees, with half a percent of the land not forested. Today about half of that remains (52%), with just about 16% existing in a frontier forest state. Between 1990-2005, Honduras saw a decline of 37% in its forest cover.
2) Nigeria: -36%About half the land in Nigeria used to be covered in trees. Today all but about 10% of those have been chopped down, and less than one percent exist as frontier forest. Nigeria has removed 36% of its trees in the past two decades.
3) The Philippines: -32%The islands that make up the Philippines used to be all forested. Today only 35% of those forests remain; the only (slightly) good news in that is about 28% remain as frontier forest. But with a deforestation rate over the past twenty or so years of 26%, the future isn’t so bright.
) Benin: -31%Benin didn’t start out with great amounts of forest cover — only about 16% of the land used to be forested — and a high deforestation rate of 31% doesn’t help preserve what remains. Less than 4% of those original forests remain, and none in a frontier forest state.
5) Ghana: -28%At one point about two-thirds of Ghana was covered with forest; now, less than 10% of that forest cover remains and none as frontier forest. At a rate of decline since 1990 of 28%, that remaining forest doesn’t stand a chance without better forestry practices.
6) Indonesia: -26%Indonesia is a strange case. Like much of Southeast Asia it was historically entirely covered in forest, and over the whole nation some 65% of that forest cover remains, with about 29% in a frontier forest condition. But it’s seen a serious decline in that forest cover over the past two decades which doesn’t show signs of letting up.
It’s also an amazingly large country, and there are local conditions that get minimized in the stats. For example, on Borneo (the world’s third largest island) between 1985-2000 more logs were felled than in all of South America and Africa combined. Half of the lowland forest is currently gone and that could increase to two-thirds in just ten years.
7) Nepal & North Korea: -25%Nepal has about 22% of its original forest cover remaining, non of which is considered frontier forest — the past two decades saw a 25% decline in forest cover.
At one point nearly all of North Korea was forested, but today about 61% of that has been cleared — the change in forest cover since 1990 has been a decline of about 25%.
9) Ecuador & Haiti: -22%Rounding out the bottom of the top, as it were, are Ecuador, Liberia, and Haiti, all of which have witnessed 22% declines in forest cover since 1990.
Ecuador was originally largely forested, but today has about two-thirds of that forest cover remaining. The comparatively good news is that about 37% of that is frontier forest.
The bad news about Haiti is that it has had a 22% decline in forest cover in the past twenty years. The even worse news is that Haiti has already cleared all but a fraction of a percent of it’s original forest, 99.2% to be exact. Here’s the symbol par excellence of what happens when you have horrendous forestry practice.

INDONESIA,KEEP IT UP!!!

Hopefully it comes as no great surprise to you that deforestation is a major problem in many areas of the world, both it terms of preserving biodiversity and preventing climate change — some countries are chopping down their forests at astonishing rates. But what you may not know is which nations really have the highest rates of deforestation, so here they are:
When considering all these, for sake of comparison, even though Brazil gets a lot of the heat for Amazonian deforestation — and rightly so, considering the total area of land cleared — as a percentage of landmass cleared it isn’t even in the the top twenty. Over the past twenty years or so the deforestation rate has been 8% and over 70% of historic forest cover remains.
NOTE: All the data in this post has been derived from the truly informative and well presented Google Earth layer on deforestation, created by David Tryse, which draws its data from the World Resources Institute and Greenpeace. All percentages refer to the years 1990-2005.
1) Honduras: -37%Historically Honduras was pretty much entirely covered by trees, with half a percent of the land not forested. Today about half of that remains (52%), with just about 16% existing in a frontier forest state. Between 1990-2005, Honduras saw a decline of 37% in its forest cover.
2) Nigeria: -36%About half the land in Nigeria used to be covered in trees. Today all but about 10% of those have been chopped down, and less than one percent exist as frontier forest. Nigeria has removed 36% of its trees in the past two decades.
3) The Philippines: -32%The islands that make up the Philippines used to be all forested. Today only 35% of those forests remain; the only (slightly) good news in that is about 28% remain as frontier forest. But with a deforestation rate over the past twenty or so years of 26%, the future isn’t so bright.
) Benin: -31%Benin didn’t start out with great amounts of forest cover — only about 16% of the land used to be forested — and a high deforestation rate of 31% doesn’t help preserve what remains. Less than 4% of those original forests remain, and none in a frontier forest state.
5) Ghana: -28%At one point about two-thirds of Ghana was covered with forest; now, less than 10% of that forest cover remains and none as frontier forest. At a rate of decline since 1990 of 28%, that remaining forest doesn’t stand a chance without better forestry practices.
6) Indonesia: -26%Indonesia is a strange case. Like much of Southeast Asia it was historically entirely covered in forest, and over the whole nation some 65% of that forest cover remains, with about 29% in a frontier forest condition. But it’s seen a serious decline in that forest cover over the past two decades which doesn’t show signs of letting up.
It’s also an amazingly large country, and there are local conditions that get minimized in the stats. For example, on Borneo (the world’s third largest island) between 1985-2000 more logs were felled than in all of South America and Africa combined. Half of the lowland forest is currently gone and that could increase to two-thirds in just ten years.
7) Nepal & North Korea: -25%Nepal has about 22% of its original forest cover remaining, non of which is considered frontier forest — the past two decades saw a 25% decline in forest cover.
At one point nearly all of North Korea was forested, but today about 61% of that has been cleared — the change in forest cover since 1990 has been a decline of about 25%.
9) Ecuador & Haiti: -22%Rounding out the bottom of the top, as it were, are Ecuador, Liberia, and Haiti, all of which have witnessed 22% declines in forest cover since 1990.
Ecuador was originally largely forested, but today has about two-thirds of that forest cover remaining. The comparatively good news is that about 37% of that is frontier forest.
The bad news about Haiti is that it has had a 22% decline in forest cover in the past twenty years. The even worse news is that Haiti has already cleared all but a fraction of a percent of it’s original forest, 99.2% to be exact. Here’s the symbol par excellence of what happens when you have horrendous forestry practice.

LISTENING: SOMETHING THAT MAKES A BETTER PERSON

Les Giblin stated in The Art of Dealing with People:”Oilver Wendell Holmes once said being able to listen to others in a sympathetic and understanding manner is perhaps the most effective mechanism to have a better interpersonal relationship and a better friendship”.
Listening makes you smart!
Contrary to popular opinion that we have to speak to show we’re smart, listening in fact may cause the same effect. Sometimes I let myself silent and listen to others’ opinions, complaints, and then I find myself a wiser person. Yeah, it’s true…When pals of mine tell some bad experiences they had, I tried to soothe them, comfort them, and by this, I tried to overlook the downside of the matters. Turns out the problems weren’t that bad….So listening really teaches me sensitivity and wisdom and of course the art of positive thinking.
People will say what they want so long as you’re available for them
Two-way human interaction is the best type of interaction. So don’t let you deaf to what others people want you to know. Sit together, sip some tea or coffee, listen and respond properly. It works most of the time.
Talking too much is a self-suicidal act
Successful people are skillful at making others talk and reveal their opinion and thinking. Speak moderately. Sometimes it’s better for you to keep silent a while, let our partner spill everything s/he wants and there’s some point where you can respond wisely.
Self-absorbed people tend to have less friends
I know some people in my social life who seem to have no close friends. As I tried to find out why by talking to them in person, I instantly knew they’re such a self-absorbed person. They gave me a little amount of chance to speak, they’re relentlessly rambling about their achievements, in a seemingly very proud manner…They tried hard to impress other interlocutors, they kept talking about something boring, their own personal experience everyone else can’t even grasp or ever had…Talk and get laid back, you’ll get more than what you expect.
Know what they want, what they need, who they are, and you’ll be able to communicate effectively
Listening to someone while s/he’s talking is simply an appreciation of their existence. When you’re listening to what they speak, they feel like they’re an important person. Remember, most of us are glad to get other people’s attention and appreciation.

LISTENING: SOMETHING THAT MAKES A BETTER PERSON

Les Giblin stated in The Art of Dealing with People:”Oilver Wendell Holmes once said being able to listen to others in a sympathetic and understanding manner is perhaps the most effective mechanism to have a better interpersonal relationship and a better friendship”.
Listening makes you smart!
Contrary to popular opinion that we have to speak to show we’re smart, listening in fact may cause the same effect. Sometimes I let myself silent and listen to others’ opinions, complaints, and then I find myself a wiser person. Yeah, it’s true…When pals of mine tell some bad experiences they had, I tried to soothe them, comfort them, and by this, I tried to overlook the downside of the matters. Turns out the problems weren’t that bad….So listening really teaches me sensitivity and wisdom and of course the art of positive thinking.
People will say what they want so long as you’re available for them
Two-way human interaction is the best type of interaction. So don’t let you deaf to what others people want you to know. Sit together, sip some tea or coffee, listen and respond properly. It works most of the time.
Talking too much is a self-suicidal act
Successful people are skillful at making others talk and reveal their opinion and thinking. Speak moderately. Sometimes it’s better for you to keep silent a while, let our partner spill everything s/he wants and there’s some point where you can respond wisely.
Self-absorbed people tend to have less friends
I know some people in my social life who seem to have no close friends. As I tried to find out why by talking to them in person, I instantly knew they’re such a self-absorbed person. They gave me a little amount of chance to speak, they’re relentlessly rambling about their achievements, in a seemingly very proud manner…They tried hard to impress other interlocutors, they kept talking about something boring, their own personal experience everyone else can’t even grasp or ever had…Talk and get laid back, you’ll get more than what you expect.
Know what they want, what they need, who they are, and you’ll be able to communicate effectively
Listening to someone while s/he’s talking is simply an appreciation of their existence. When you’re listening to what they speak, they feel like they’re an important person. Remember, most of us are glad to get other people’s attention and appreciation.

I DON'T REALLY LIKE NATURAL SCIENCES AND NEITHER DO INDONESIAN STUDENTS NOWADAYS….

“Govt to attract students to natural sciences” is the huge headline on The Jakarta Post a couple of days ago, which dragged me to my past memory. I preferred English Literature to exact,or natural science.
First of all, all my family members and relatives are not farmers, fishermen,or people related to any jobs requiring them to study or learn how to fish well, plant well, breed cattle well. So i don’t really have any background or even wild imagination of earning my living as one of those. Therefore, I suppose it’s a kind of cultural and mindset hindrance. How can Indonesia be a modern maritime,agricultural country while the parents don’t really endorse the proud of being a maritime, agricultural country to their kids? Indeed, Indonesian still think that such jobs aren’t quite prestigious. Most of them (and my dad isn’t an exception) have a stance that having a job or getting a job as a govt civil servant is the best, as it is the safest, most financially guaranteed job. You get paid monthly, at a regular interval, without even having to think what to do something innovative, to create something new, to think creatively, which these people only consider as ‘difficulty’. You just obey the rules, do what your superior tells to you to do, and that’s it. But for some others, the difficulty may be viewed as ‘challenge’, ‘opportunity’.
The universities try to tackle this by offering scholarships (like what the University of Indonesia’s rector stated), changing the name of the subject into something more interesting (which sounds quite shallow and silly to me!), incorporating the natural sciences with other sciences to respond to the job market’s demand, and giving grants to the existing natural science departments to develop or improve the infrastructure and overall quality.

THE SHORTEST SHORTCUT

It’s been a while since the last time I sat in a classroom staring at a tutor,lecturer, or whoever it may be called. These past three and a half years what I’ve been doing is presenting and explaining materials in front of others, simply put.
But this is definitely a new experience….Learning a foreign language from almost zero..yeah pretty much from the very bottom, the very basics of everything. Being a novice still gives a different sense to me. I love the challenges, adore the complaints I’m continuously saying when ordered to memorize numerous number of new vocabularies, and definitely enjoy the satisfaction when winning the race against the lazy part of me.
Today wasn’t quite fun. My tutor, Anwar Sonsaengnim (that’s what we should call him-I’m taking Korean course), was away and we -other students and I- were simply abandoned in a not-so-spacious classroom.
Some strangers were coming into the door, wanting to meet our sonsaengnim (“teacher/someone clever” in Korean). They were apparently his guests wishing to discuss something with him.
Before leaving us, he assigned us to do the exercises. I happened to know that there was already a answer key page attached in the rearmost part of the textbook. No one in my class, however, was aware of this, at least as far as I knew. It seemed that they never read or scrutinized the book before, which is so unbelievable as we have it as our sole source of learning. Yeah, they didn’t know until I disclosed the fact that there was an answer key! At first they all took the assignment quite seriously…but I then decided to test how far they can think for their own sake. And I should’ve known they’d fail it. I spilled out the ‘top secret’, the rest of the class heard it, and proved my word. Some looked so surprised (they found all of the answers), and of course happy at the same time. Without even thinking twice, they copied all the answers.
I felt so sorry for their failure of being a good, sensible student. Most of them are younger than me, and they have less motivation to absorb the knowledge…What they always think is the shortest shortcut
But I hate shortcuts that intensify the complexity of my life…I hate shortcuts that create more problems than solve problems.
As I finished my course, I also tried to build my own Korean learning blog

WHY SHOULD WE THANK PANDORA?

It was a divine coincidence that I stumbled upon a Greek story about Pandora on http://greece.mrdonn.org/greekgods/pandora.html. After I thought a moment after that, I realized how inspiring this story/myth can be for us and can be a theme story for this blog. Human beings were destined to live in sufferings, pain, difficulties, and lots of others untold predicaments.
After Pandora stole and opened the lid of the box Zeus gave to her husband, it is told that:
“Out flew every kind of disease and sickness, hate and envy, and all the bad things that people had never experienced before. Pandora slammed the lid closed, but it was too late. All the bad things were already out of the box. They flew away, out into the world.
Pandora cried and cried. Epimetheus woke up at the sound of her sobbing. I opened the box and all these ugly things flew out,?she cried. I tried to catch them, but they all got out.?Pandora opened the box to show him how empty it was. But the box was not quite empty. One tiny bug flew quickly out before Pandora could slam the lid shut again.
Hello, Pandora,?said the bug, hovering just out of reach. My name is Hope. With a nod of thanks for being set free, Hope flew out into the world, a world that now held Envy, Crime, Hate, and Disease, and also Hope.”
So many people out there are struggling to figure out the mystery of life and each of us is having problems with our lives. Frustrating but true, we need those ugly things named Envy, Crime, Hate, and Disease to make our extremely gloomy world turn bright. Those ugly things seem to be blessings in disguise, for those who know how to live this life.
As for me now, I need to open another ’Pandora’s box’ not to make myself suffer from all the misery it may cause, but to give myself the hope I need to continue this life in a more meaningful way. Starting something new is like opening a box we don’t know the content at all. And what it all takes is the courage to simply open, start, begin, and dispel the haunting fear at the very same time. Pandora had risked herself by opening the box and finally gotten the merits of Hope. So? Let’s focus on releasing Hope in our own box,as Hope is worth releasing.
Thanks Pandora for releasing hope for us…