4 Benefits of Volunteering at Mozilla Community Space

Just a brief caveat, I’m not going to say anything here about the free-flow snacks and drinks and free internet connection available at anytime (though they’re two of the benefits to lure more people into coming more often and spend nights there).

Here I give you four of so many benefits of volunteering as a keyholder at Mozilla Community Space.


Certainly Mozilla Community Space is no place to go to cure your mental disorder or illness but I’m serious about this. According to Harvard Health Publishing (a publishing section of Harvard Medical School), people who volunteer have a better mental health condition. Stephanie Watson of Harvard Women’s Health Watch elaborates on this point, saying:

Studies have shown that volunteering helps people who donate their time feel more socially connected, thus warding off loneliness and depression. (source: healthharvard.edu)

It’s an inconceivable benefit that I’m sure everyone wants to reap from volunteering for any social causes, including Mozilla which is a non-profit organization.

In Mozilla Community Space, you’ll meet not only friends you’re already familiar with but also an endless supply of new acquaintances who can bring you a lot of new perspectives in life.


It’s useless to live a long life but bedridden, too il to wake up and enjoy the world and all things in it. That’s why I pick the ‘health span’ term instead of ‘life span’.

Great news for you who are too worried about your physical health, and most specifically your blood pressure. Now, you can get less dependent on your anti-hypertension medication by spending more time to volunteer in Mozilla Community Space.

More on this, read on below:

Those who had volunteered at least 200 hr in the 12 months prior to baseline were less likely to develop hypertension (OR = 0.60; 95% CI [0.40, 0.90]) than nonvolunteers. There was no association between volunteerism and hypertension risk at lower levels of volunteer participation. Volunteering at least 200 hr was also associated with greater increases in psychological well-being (source: here).


If you’re under 40 years old like me, volunteering does nothing to boost your wellbeing but hey, let me tell you that the benefit is not always about health. Volunteering can be impactful even if you’re a lot younger, especially when it comes to networking. Volunteering at young age  especially allows you to get exposed to people and worlds outside of your comfort zone. For young people, that comfort zone may be your school, your family and immediate relatives maybe. But if you volunteer, you’ll discover so many unknown worlds other than people you’ve known since your childhood.

In Mozilla Community Space, I can meet with younger people, lots of them actually (I’m the eldest newly-appointed keyholder). And seeing these youths who are as old as my younger siblings pretty much gives me a great deal of youthful spirit. Besides, more acquaintances means more opportunities in fact.


Life is a lot more boring if you only focus on your personal life goals. You want this and that and when you have it all, only you can enjoy it. Life can be more meaningful than that by volunteering your time and energy to a specific cause you prefer.

So what’s my cause?


For the sake of freedom in the virtual world, I want to be more actively involved in Mozilla Indonesia.

Why Mozilla?

Because nowadays our freedom as internet users have been ‘robbed’ by all tech giants like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, etc. We are made to trade our privacy and private details with convenience, a bait too tempting to refuse. They shape our lives and our future as human civilization, too. So we need an alternative which is free from business, commercial interests.

The keyword is FREEDOM.

Freedom to make choices, whether we willingly swap our privacy for convenience or hold tightly that last shred of privacy and explore the web without being herded like a bunch of dumb sheeps and being fed by grass decided by algorithms.  (*/)

Mozilla Team at Pesta Blogger 2010: IS THE WEB DEAD?

Gen Kanai - the Director of Asia Business Development for Mozilla - served as the first speaker presenting "Is the Web Dead?".
Fifteen minutes prior to starting off the class discussion, Gen Kanai, William Quiviger and Dietrich Ayala were already preparing the equipment. Some bright yellow (Mozilla’s dominant logo color) souvenirs were distributed for anyone taking part in the discussion. Gen was spotted trying to adjust the colors produced by the projector but he seemed desperate (so there may be a better quality LCD projectorin the future provided for each and every room).The one-hour break passed by so quickly, which meant very few participants entered the room in time. William whispered something to Dietrich telling him some other rooms were even worse than ours (having fewer number of audience in the room) . Most of the participants are Muslims so the break time wouldn’t only be needed to have their lunch but also to pray. It worsened as the participants weren’t reminded of the break time (which was supposed to be at 12 pm sharp). They were glued to the performance on the main stage instead of rushing to the caterer for lunch.

So the presentation started a bit late. Gen Kanai spoke first. Soon the room with scarce audience got filled quite fast. It was perhaps because of some Mozilla community members entering the room, I guess. Cameras were taking pictures occasionally before and during the presentation.
Continue reading “Mozilla Team at Pesta Blogger 2010: IS THE WEB DEAD?”