A Little Life, A Gigantic Read

[This contains too much spoiler. So if you haven’t read this novel and wish to read it anytime soon, I have warned you. Or save this page to read later on.]

HANYA Yanagihara is one of those novelists who shun reading reviews. That makes sense as not all reviews are worth her time. And reading online reviews about your book seems to be very daunting and exhausting mentally.

What I’m writing below can never be called a proper review. Rather, it’s a sincere flattery of her tremendously thick and rich work.

Verbose, that’s certainly what came to my mind after I read the novel from cover to cover. But Yanagihara has a strong and sensible argument as to why the novel must be verbose.

I’ve been working for quite a while in magazines, which is why I’m so familiar with Yanagihara’s style of writing [for your information she’d worked as editor at CondeNast Traveler]. Her style is so magazinelike, making me sure that what I’m reading is actually a compilation of short stories or novellas skillfully sewn together as a mega novel. 

Salman Rushdie’s son recommended once after reading Harry Potter series that his father should write books published in series. Why? Rushdie said,”Easy. It’s more lucrative to publish that way.” Smart.

So I’m curious as to why Yanagihara never gave the idea any single consideration.  The idea that publishing in series or sequels does really make sense and enticing if one is a for-profit, commercial author. Yanagihara, as she admitted, is not one. She said an author especially those writing fiction must have a day job. Not only for the healthcare benefits, she added, but also because a day job provides you (paid) escape from all the emotional hardship one has to endure in the writing process of a long novel.

She mentions about her wish to make the story to become as claustrophobic as possible because she always tells it everything indoor. There’s not much told and narrated about the city’s landmarks, or landscape, or its wide array of population and all the humanity in it. Yanagihara is like using a microscope when telling the story of a horribly abused, lonesome, battered protagonist who never ever recovered thorughout his unexpectedly long life, Jude Saint Francis. She doesn’t allow any outdoor details coming into the story in abundance. Yet, the novel seems very generous when it comes to private lives of its characters. The author adds every detail (like their habit of getting together at a Vietnamese restaurant) and makes the story flow in a perfectly smooth fashion.

I like Yanagihara’s preference to pick some characters as her focus. She concentrates more on Willem and Jude’s relationships and how they and the ties change from time to time. Malcom and JB’s life may be considered supplementary compared to the other two though both later mentioned are also in the same clique.

If there’s something I’m very upset about the story is the fact that Jude is made in such a way to be an incurable victim throughout the novel. He is made to be forever suffering, relapsing, and going downhill.  All of betterment or progress he seems to make are fake and delusional. He is so rotten and damaged from the inside and out (I cannot imagine seeing his arms and legs which are depicted to be full of cuttings and infected wounds).

The issue of pedophilia raised here is so much relevant to the current issue of the day especially in Indonesia. I read KPAI (The Commission of Children Protection in Indonesia) has released a statement that now young boys are as fragile as girls when it comes to sexual abuse (considering the growing number of young male victims of sexual abuse). That said, the social problem doesn’t discriminate genders now. Whether you’re a parent of a boy or a girl, you need to be equally worrisome because boys apparently are also in need of protection also. It is always that way but public had never realized it until recently.

I’m also glad to see a new perspective towards male and masculinity from the point of view of a female author. This offers a unique  and fresh story and novel criticism not only towards people with penis but also the entire humanity as a whole unity.

I like her proposed ideology that males are allowed to feel weak and fragile and can speak up about their pain and suffering just like their female counterparts. Though I have to admit that such view takes a long time to be practiced in real life.  (*/)

Monetizing Your English Writing Skills

(Foto: Setyo Jojo)

A writer is a reader, listener and thinker who writes.” – Akhlis Purnomo

There’s nothing better than sharing your experience with all the people around you. When it comes to experience, even sharing what seems so trivial, no-brainer, basic and little to us may mean a lot and proves insightful and inspiring to others.  So I decided to also share this with you all on my blog.

The title of the piece itself was derived from a presentation title I served in the middle of November 2017 at the English Department, Universitas Jenderal Soedirman (Unsoed). The presentation brought some nostalgic ambiance, I have to admit, as it’s been a while since the last time I taught a bunch of young folks in a classroom and it gave me quite a shiver. My teaching days were over but the urge to share can’t fade that easily. It’s embedded permanently in my DNA. Which explains why no matter how hard I try to dissuade this urge, I fail again and again miserably.

The bedroom writer

Teaching was a career path I decided to abandon after I resolved writing is the best career for the future Akhlis. This started quietly in my bedroom in 2009. One night I started blogging (armed with a brand new laptop and a CDMA phone as the modem, which worked painfully slow).

At the time, blogging was a relatively new thing. And the more I wrote for my own blog, I found it more interesting day by day. It was because of the internet marketing opportunities which were and still are limitless. It was tempting for an introverted for me to be able to make money without even seeing too many people out there. Even networking is doable via social media and email.

The idea of becoming a professional blogger sparked on my mind and I thus began blogging soon after that. I browsed the entire web days and nights to learn how to make money from my blog. By then, all I knew was Darren Rowse (with his problogger.net), Brian Clark (with his copyblogger.com), Deborah Ng (with her freelancewritinggigs.com), and some other professional bloggers from Anglosaxon countries (Australia, the States, or the UK). I bought their ebooks and got hooked by the offers of the ease of making money with websites and content, which I can produce on daily basis because I can write in English.

But my main problem was the connection speed. My hometown was not a place where the internet providers operated the best. Their quality of service sucked a lot. They existed but gave me more frustration more than convenience. Of course, I still could exchange emails (with lots of trial because the connection might be cut off in the process) but viewing images and videos was an ordeal still at the time.

And then I stumbled upon a great blog called thoushallblog.com. It was clean, simple and interesting, with high quality content that I liked a lot (I recently visited the blog but sadly it wasn’t live any longer). I somehow managed to contact its owner. He was a Malaysian internet marketer named Yan Susanto, if I’m not mistaken. He confessed to have grown up in Tasikmalaya, some town in Western Java province but then his family made a move to Malaysia and since then never came back.

That year (2009), I learned a lot about internet marketing from Yan. We chatted a lot via email and I actively asked him about the nuts and bolts of it. I suddenly found myself glued to my laptop days and nights. I wanted to buy a domain for my first personal blog (hosted by blogger.com), a PayPal account, and a software. All was because I wanted to be like Yan. A financially-independent internet marketer.

In the course of that, one thing I realized was that I lacked technical skills. While it seemed that Yan was more skillful at it. His mastery of web development and SEO (search engine optimization) was impressive and I saw myself as ‘a little kid in the neighborhood’. I knew almost nothing. But Yan was willing to help me through this learning phase by giving me some guidance on how to make great quality content. He taught me on link building techniques, how to rewrite a piece of content so it looked fresh and new and unique, how to write a product review in English. He paid me as a contributor and helper of his SEO campaigns.

Things changed. From 2010 on, I launched my writing career by moving to Jakarta as an Indonesian-English translator and web content writer for an illustrious property company’s  web portal in the heart of Jakarta’s business district.  In the course of my writing career, I was given another new responsibility which was beyond my imagination. I had to see and talk to people. Real people this time. It was no people on screen just like what I did with Yan. Awesome. And from there I was officially appointed online reporter/ journalist in the company.

Along with that, I also began to learn more about social media. After I made content, the time had come for me to know how to market it on the web. So I  set up a convincing social media presence on Twitter and Facebook and Koprol (an Indonesian social media site which was then acquired by Yahoo). From time to time, I studied and practiced social media management and boy had it taught me a lot of things!

Another phase of my writing career was about to occur when in 2015 I ran into a friend working in the publishing industry. She wanted me to work with her on an English book writing project. We were working in tandem and tackling whatever issues together. I learned much from this writing gig. It was about the workflow, the researching, writing and editing process, all of which were quite different from the ones I’ve been familiar with in the web publishing industry. That was my first time to immerse myself in the book writing process.

Happening simultaneously was also the publishing of some of my pieces (columns and opinions) in the country’s big news portals (more on this, kindly go to my ‘portfolio’ article on this very blog) like detik.com and kompas.com. Whereas, Indonesiana.com also picked some of my pieces to be published on Koran Tempo (both are affiliated media under the same holding company).

Later on, I also managed to get published as a solo writer of my own content by working as a magazine writer. This was quite challenging because I had to be responsible for all the content of a certain edition. The content ranged from translation of English articles (as the magazine was part of global franchise network) and some authentic content I had to acquire (6 articles altogether). All these were my entire workloads to finish within only a couple of weeks (yes, two weeks only!). It was so tight a deadline.

Almost at the same time, I was also preparing another project on a different theme. This one was primarily concerned about social media.  It was rather tough as well as I had to be preparing three different sets of materials for three different government clients. In this project, I was the social media expert invited to share my 5-year experience in my previous company.

What a journey…

To the English Department students of Unsoed, I hurled a rethorical question of this.

What it takes to be a successful writer?

Here were my answers for them:

  • Passion: Passion is NOT overrated, as far as I’m concerned. It’s the fuel of your long long career journey. It’s the thing that enables you to stay on track when others start to give up, succumb and switch paths. It’s one thing in your very essence that enables you to be stubborn as you’re spearing ahead, laser-focusing your efforts towards one single career objective.
  • Discipline: This is one of the essential skills to have and nurture in a writer’s soul. Yes, writers are artists working with words but that doesn’t mean you can get lazy with your work. Set up your own schedule if you have no employer (act as your own employer!) and stick to it. And discipline makes you a better writer working in a team. Or else, you can be much hated because of your insanely awful attitude, believing you can only work when inspiration comes along. No, a professional writer doesn’t wait for inspiration. S/he builds one, instead.
  • Focus: You may be working at a cafe or office or your own bedroom. Space is no big deal as long as you can focus on your work and get it all done on time. There’s no use to splurge on an expensive beverage but you miss your deadline and enrage your editor after that.
  • Tenacity: Writers at times must be tenacious. Surely it feels like you’re banging your head onto the solid brick wall until you bleed and unconscious. But one really has to be that strong-willed to be a writer.
  • Carefulness: Select your words, punctuations, characters carefully as these may determine your success and failure.
  • Attention to details: Again, small things matter. Remember, small successes accumulate and build up your bigger successes. At least, that’s what I believe and really happened to me (though luck and serendipity also did contribute – in an unreliable amount though). Of course, some people argue that a few writers don’t pay attention to details that much and yet they achieve magnificent attainment but believe me, they must have something else to compensate for that ‘flaw’.

The perks of a writer

Speaking of perks of working as a writer, there’re myriad. And these are some of the best that I think you ought to consider.

Ultra flexibility

The best perk as a writer is the flexibility. For a free soul going after inspirations, there’s nothing better than being able to move around  or stay at a certain spot as you like (as long as you can immediately meet those deadlines). Most of the time, I don’t work at a given worksplace like any other employees or corporate workers. I can always choose to work anywhere I wish. But of course, there’re times when I need to go to a certain place to take part in a meeting with clients or teams I’m working with. Yet, these meetings can in fact happen anywhere. And as long as things are resolvable via email or online networking, we can set aside the idea of going out every single day. On a typical day of work, I can just wake up and work on my draft in my own bedroom if a day’s weather doesn’t seem so agreeable. As for me, I work at my own pace mostly and this makes me really happy. As long as deadlines are met perfectly and punctually and no client complains too much, I’m safe and sound working at a place of my choice. Being an office rat is something you no more have to endure during your productive years. You can still make money and go on with your journey.

Less social fuss

Not all writers are introverted. But most of them, I‘m sure, are. This is the first and foremost reason why I left my teaching job and resorted to writing in the first place. I can conveniently turn down any invitation to unnecessary in-person meetings and only meet people whom I feel important in project finalization.

While we have learned the brightest side of the profession, I also feel the necessity to inform you this.

The downsides of working as a writer

The price you have to pay for all the conveniences is quite high though.

Possibly long working hours

Writing – to most people out there – is likened  to typing. If you have fingers, eyes, paper, ink or something to type on and with, then chances are you can make money by writing. This is not quite right. There’re soft skills one has to acquire and master to really succeed at this realm of writing. Writing (read: the typing work) is actually easy and effortless, intellectually speaking. But what takes most time is the research (because you have to learn many topics and hence understand what you write and form your own proposition on all these subject matters). Rewriting one needs to do after writing because rewriting the first draft – which is usually awful, highly disorganized and thus hardly understandable to readers other than the writer herself – is inevitable unless a writer has hired and teamed up with a very very competent (and patient and kind-hearted and soft-mouthed) editor with much free time to lend a hand to perfect the draft.

The emotional turbulence

Emotion is also a noteworthy point. I mean the movement of your writing spirit may fluctuate from time to time. There’re ups and downs along the way. One day it can really overwhelm you until you can’t stop jotting down all the ideas on your mind. But there’re also days when ideas don’t flow as easily as usually. You drag yourself while writing, as if you were crossing through a desert as vast as Gobi and Sahara Desert combined.

Sedentary lifestyle

Another major issue I have to deal with as a writer is the sedentary lifestyle, which is destructive in the long run towards your wellbeing in general. Some writers find themselves gain weight more easily and as the writing career progressing, the worse their obesity issue is getting. I’m not going to preach about the peril of adopting the lifestyle of George R. R. Martin who needs to pay more attention to his ideal weight for the sake of his health or Lee Child who smokes and works till late at night and never feels remorse for that. In this aspect, I prefer adopting Haruki Murakami’s approach to the unhealthy and sedentary lifestyle of writers by breaking the vicious circle of disapproving habits such as smoking and eating junk foods on daily basis and setting up a daily discipline of resting and working which is in accordance with the circadian rhythm of our body (the natural rhythm of how our body works and takes rest). After a few years in his twenties running a night club, he realized it was impossible for him to keep up with the demand of writing if his lifestyle remained similar. He sold the club and quit waking up so late before noon and started to wake up and go to bed earlier than he used to. And guess what? He began regaining his health and productivity. And at the very same time, he shed all those extra fats by taking up running as his main workout regime. He succeeded after all. Thank God, yoga came along and since the very first time I gave yoga a try, I slowly but certainly reclaimed my long-lost physical health (and mostly strength and later, flexibility) and then my peace of mind (which is really essential because writing is an intellectual and cerebral toil). Meditation, which is one part of the yoga practice, proves to be quite useful to counterbalance the bad effects of perpetual mental work which I do during the writing process.

Let’s say you’re interested in this kind of career. You may ask:

What writing skills that are in high demand currently?”

Many. But in essence, there’re three of them:

1. Web content

2. Business writing

3. Creative writing

For all the hopefuls out there, learning how to write well may lead you to many career paths. It’s not confined to writing books or articles in magazines. Modern professions for writers among other things are:

Content writers (websites)

This is the entry-level job mostly opened for fresh graduates. But even if you’re still students, employers don’t mind your lack of work experience or academic credentials. A few of them are even opening jobs like this for high school or vocational school graduates. They just need – as it may seem – the ability of typing and arranging words in your mother tongue (obviously this is a simple and much less intellectually demanding job) and publish it every day. Grammar and punctuation and flow of ideas might not be a big deal here. The focus is getting messages across to audience. These are like sweat shop workers in the modern era. The difference is that they don’t produce cheap goods sold with super pricey price tags. Rather, they generate an enormous amount of content at a speed of light because readers must be attracted and then spoonfed with novel, fresh, easily digested, interesting and visually pleasant content that cater their reading taste (or what content publishers guess is their reading taste) as often as possible. This is because pageviews is the ultimate goal for most online media business owners. More pageviews, more visitors, more advertisers and hence more income. It’s all about bottomline. Profits and money.

Copywriters (media/ agencies)

Being more lucrative than the content writing industry, copywriting is quite challenging even for middle-level writers and veterans. This is because generating copies for companies need a long learning curve. The stamina and concentration must be maintained along the process because it’s very formal by nature (therefore there’s no excuse for fatal typos) and contains sensitive data and information to convey to their valued shareholders and stakeholders. What you need to bear in mind is how to bring positivity and good images to readers even when the real situation is far from positive. I’m not saying you act as a spin doctor here but you have to know how to convey facts without evoking undesired reactions from the market and public. When a company books an outstandingly high profit, you have to find words to convey the message humbly so your wordings don’t attract too much attention from ‘nosy’ bureaucracy. But on another occasion, when you see a company generating a very miserable sum of profit (and even in more pathetic cases, suffered from huge financial losses owing to massive frauds or scandals), you as a copywriter must figure out a way to pick words that won’t kill that company’s image once and for all but at the same time, you can’t lie and have to tell the truth to audience. That said, it takes so many skills for someone to master to become a fully-fledged, seasoned copywriter. Not to mention a particular style one has to adopt in the writing process, and the workflows which may vary from one business to another, and workloads which get stuffed mostly in the first semester of each year (January-May is the busiest period because most business entities are to issue their annual reports by the end of May or June). Copywriters though must also be able to work in team and present their ideas well in front of potential clients (so if you’re an abnormally shy and solitary type of person, this is a job offer to refuse to accept or else you can get some heart attack in public). Once clients say yes, copywriters can move on with elaboration of the proposal. It’s highly complicated and stressful but rewarding as well.

Journalists (press companies)

Working as a journalist is another alternative to capitalize on your English writing skills. In the epoch of hoax like (cough) these days, there’s no profession as much required as a professional journalist with moral and proper journalism ethics and good work ethos. Such a species is rare and hard to find. Public wants it so much (though they also still want to read hoax – in their subconscious mind). People need truth to be told as it really is. Hoax is not tolerable at any rate whenever we are dealt with a crucial public event that not only affects our private life but also a nation and the entire human race’s future, such as a presidential election (I don’t have to elaborate on this). And however hard we educate people on the significance of identifying a hoax-spreading media outlet, it’s fruitless without looking for and recruiting the right people. And great writers are also good journalists for their readers as well. Take a look at Ernest Hemingway who worked as a war journalist during the World War I before plunging himself into the literary world or Gillian Flynn who worked for a magazine as a reporter and writer prior to being sacked and launching her own fiction writing career.

PR officers (corporations/ brands)

It may sound odd at first for a writer to work as a PR officer. But companies – small and big – need people who are competent enough to play with words, to polish their images before the public. This sort of job requires you to be skillful at writing press releases, corporate newsletters, business correspondence, dealing with media workers (journalists).

Bloggers/ social media officers

As more and more people blog these days (but fail to be fully committed to regularly keeping their blogs as well), companies also need content to attract visitors to their websites. Blogs cheer up ‘dry’ and boring corporate websites with fresh and engaging content. Social media presence is also getting more priority recently. All of this requires a separate team or at least a couple of people to handle (depending on how seriously a company takes their image).

Ghostwriters

If you happen to know a lot of important and influential people with abundant ideas and great track records around you and they don’t have any books (print or electronic) to sell their ideas yet, you can help them do so by working as their ghostwriter. Let them know you can write and show them your portfolio (samples of your writing, which can be in the electronic or physical/ printed form). Once again, you may find your clients by chance as you tell people you’re a writer and simultaneously broaden your network. I canNOT stress more on the importance of having a wide network. It’s as important as your fingers to scribble and type.

Travel writers

Leisure economy is in the rise. Everyone is following the trend. Tourism growth is soaring. The majority of tourists is of course travelers who just take photos to publish on their Instagram feeds as they sightsee tourist attractions around the globe. But there’re also very few of them with some writing and photography  (and maybe videography) talent and seem very keen to capitalize on their traveling lifestyle. They succeed as influencers in this newly-invented domain. And you can also be one of them. The qualities of great travelwriters, as far as I know, are many but the most fundamental ones are details (meaning you need to take notes on almost every detail of a trip you take), consistency (you can’t succeed if you just post once and wish you’ll be famous overnight), and financial stability (most of tools to make a high quality travel writing piece are NOT cheap at all).

Fiction writers (novelists)

Fiction writing is of course lucrative – if you’re J. K. Rowling. I’m sorry to wake you up from this dream, but it doesn’t work that way AT FIRST. As a beginner in the fiction writing industry, you might have to expose yourselves to a lot of people out there and make as many works as you can to be known. And if you’re talented and lucky enough, someone will help you get a book deal which leads you to a publication. But it’s a long long process to undergo from anonimity to fame. No one knows the recipe or formula to be a successful novelist. What you can discover is only assumptions, clever guess or data-driven speculation (like this blogpost I wrote).

Practice 1 (15 minutes)

Find a news item, or pick an event that interests you. Using the ‘who, what, when, where, why’ of the item – and your imagination – rewrite it as a detailed, interesting narrative story consisting of around 300-400 words. Post it on your Facebook wall afterwards. See how people react to it. More reactions (likes and comments) may mean your writing is more successful to attract readers.

How to monetize your English writing skills

Finally, we arrive to this section! You’ve gone a long way. And I admit I’ve never written a blogpost this lengthy. Here’s the formula that I’ve extracted from my 8-year experience as a writer.

  1. Publish a blog and update regularly: This is even more important for novices. Because setting up a blog is relatively easy and cheap these days. If you have no money to spend on renting a domain and to host your own blog, why not setting up one on some popular free blogging platforms like blogger.com or wordpress.com? Or if you want more exposure and recognition, go to kompasiana.com or indonesiana.com. Both are citizen journalism sites where you can upload your writing for free.
  2. Build a strong personal brand as a professional writer: Being a writer means you’re more careful with words and always attentive to your language. On social media, try to present yourselves as a thought leader or social media darling. I’m not saying you must be fake but instead of exposing your personal sides that don’t support your writing pursuit, try to reveal the writer side of yours to the world. After all, this is the best way to convince people that you’re seriously into writing.
  3. Write where the money is: At first, as a novice you can write for free but as you go along on your career path, writing for free should no longer be an option (unless you’re willing to). Give yourselves sometimes to get exposed and then be professional about your craft. Charging a certain amount of money for your hard work is not cruel because everybody DOES!
  4. Build networks with publishers, fellow writers, editors around the world: Facebook and Twitter can be a good start. But for more serious gigs and job offers, I recommend that you go to LinkedIn.com. It’s more professional and you’re less likely to find any distractions like what you find in other social media.
  5. Find opportunities on the web: There’re a zillion of opportunities in the web if you’re willing to surf and believe me, you’ll never run out of writing gigs or job offers.

Practice 2 (15 minutes)

Write a 400-word blog post (the theme is up to you) on your own blog and promote it on your social media accounts. See how your friends or followers react to it.

To conclude the post, I’ll describe my typical daily writing process as follows:

  • Writing freely in a personal journal: A warmup ritual for me in the morning or at anytime I want to. Writing skills are like muscles. Use or lose them!
  • Reading/ observing anything, anyone I like (and don’t): Open your eyes, hear things, feel more, think more and take notes more.
  • Writing as a professional: This time of the day I work on my project.
  • Getting my behind off the chair: Work out even if you think you don’t have to. Writers must live long enough to write.
  • Hydrating: Drink more water or juice. No soda or softdrink, please.
  • Nourishing: Stuff yourselves with healthy foods and drinks. Snacks are okay but limited and occasional.
  • Taking a rest: Close your eyes and go to bed. Stop seeing computer screens if your eyes get uncomfortably dry.

Last but not least…

  • Fake it till you make it: Don’t lie but give impression that you’re serious and professional. And walk the talk.
  • You’re what you do: You’re called a writer because you write every single day in your life. Do it now!
  • Mind the deadlines: Never miss a deadline. But if you do have to, make sure you have a very very strong reason (such as maintaining the quality of result).
  • Reread and rewrite: Polish your works until they gleam with perfection.
  • Educate yourself: Read and read and read. Feed your thought with great quality stuff. Don’t read hoax! (*)

Wildly Witty Quotations from "The Catcher in the Rye" (1)

“Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules.” (p11)

“I don’t give a damn, except that I get bored sometimes when people tell me to act my age.” (p 12)

“Do you feel absolutely no concern for your future, boy?”
“Oh, I feel some concern for my future, all right. Sure. Sure, I do.” I thought about it for a minute. “But not too much, I guess. Not too much, I guess.”
“You will,”old Spencer said. “You will, boy. You will when it’s too late.” (p 17-18)

“I mean I’m not going to be a goddam surgeon or a violinist or anything anyway.” (p44)

“He stood there, reading it, and sort of stroking his bare chest and stomach, with this very stupid expression on his face. He was always stroking his stomach or his chest. He was mad about himself.” (p46)

“You always do everything backasswards.” (p46)

“In every school I’ve gone to, all the athletic bastards stick together.” (p49)

“All morons hate it when you call them a moron.” (p50)

“You never saw such gore in your life. I had blood all over my mouth and chin and even on my pajamas and bathrobe. It partly scared me and it partly fascinated me. All that blood and all sort of made me look tough.” (p51)

“Almost every time somebody gives me a present and it ends up making me sad.” (p58)

“I put my red hunting hat on, and turned the peak around the back, the way I liked it, and then I yelled at the top of my goddam voice,”Sleep tight, ya morons!” (p59)

“Mothers are all slightly insane.” (p62)

“He was even more depressing than the room was. He was one of thise bald guys that comb all their hair over from the side to cover up the baldness. I’d rather be bald than do that.” (p68-69)

“Sex is something I really don’t understand too hot. You never know where the hell you are. I keep making up these sex rules for myself, and then I break them right away.” (p70)

“The only trouble is, she is a little too affectionate sometimes. Shek’s very emotional, for a child. She really is. Something else she does, she writes books all the time. Only, she doesn’t finish them.” (p76)

“I’m not kidding, some of these very stupid girls can really knock you out on a dance floor.” (p79)

“You don’t always have to get too sexy to get to know a girl.” (p85)

“We’d get into a goddam movie or something, and right away we’d start holding hands, and we wouldn’t quit till the movie was over.” (p89)

“I certainly like to hear him play, but sometimes you feel like turning his goddam piano over. I think it’s because sometimes when he plays, he sounds like the kind of a guy that won’t talk to you unless you’re a big shot.” (p90)

“People are always ruining things for you.” (p98)

“One of my troubles is, I never care too much when I lose something.” (p100)

“I wasn’t sleepy or anything, but I was feeling sort of lousy. Depressed and all. I almost wished I was dead.” (p101)

“It was against my principles and all, but I was feeling so depressed I didn’t even think. That’s the whole trouble. When you’re feeling depressed, you can’t even think.” (p102)

“The thing is, most of the time when you’re coming pretty close to doing it with a girl – a girl that isn’t a prostitute or anything, I mean – she keeps telling you to stop. The trouble with me is, I stop. Most guys don’t. I can’t help it.” (p103)

This Is Why Nobody Wants to Be a Wordsmith in Indonesia

Living as an author or novelist or short story writer or journalist is TOUGH, regardless of countries. Though people are inclined to see only the glory of renowned authors like JK Rowling, Danielle Steele, Elizabeth Gilbert or Dan Brown, many ignore the story behind their glamorous lives. One may find these authors’ past period as depressing. There’re millions of authors even in Western countries who are just as impoverished as we are in developing countries. These wordsmiths (people earn a living by means of arranging words) are living pathetic way of life and not many know it or even they know, give it a single damn.

Suharso (38) is one of the poor Indonesian novelists out there who struggle to make money. The man whose pen name is Aveus Har mostly makes money on daily basis by setting up a food stall selling chicken noodles. Yes, the level of the challenges in the Indonesian publishing industry may seem so overwhelming he can’t make money by writing alone. An author may be published but it doesn’t mean they’re getting more prosperous after their books are marketed. They still have so many tasks to complete:i.e. marketing their works. And this is not a part-time undertaking. S/he needs to plunge into it days and nights. Relentless, as we know it.

Suharso who lives in Pekalongan, Central Java, mentioned about not hoping his works (6 books all together and other writings fro printed publications) are making much money. That’s something I’m strongly opposed to! For God’s sake, you need to make money to live better. You’re entitled to it. If you can live better and deserve it, why shouldn’t you? I don’t know about others but this ‘humility’ should stop or wordsmiths never deserve the rewards they ought to enjoy.

Surprisingly, the novelist writes on an LG touch screen phone which screen looks ridiculously small and narrow. That’s exactly how he writes when he has spare time. I wonder why he doesn’t buy a BlackBerry instead. BlackBerry or any phones with a QWERTY keyboard would make sense, but a touch screen phone? I don’t know.

He has hopes though in spite of the authorly humility he has shown us. “I’m learning how to write a filmic novel, so if anyone wants to buy the book to make a film based on it, it’ll be much easier.

Suharso added,”I read a lot so I can write more and more. That’s how it all works.” But then I’m thinking, what if the food stall gets flooded by diners after he’s now seen on television? Could there be a food stall with a writing studio inside it?

That said, I wish him luck with the new endeavor. Now that everyone knows he’s about to write a filmic novel, I guess some potential movie directors in the country are interested in the book. Still, he’s such a phenomenon.

But hey I also have a writer friend who worked at Alfamart and now being a marketer for a telco company. Probably I must tell television journalists to cover his story.

Reference:
http://cdn.metrotvnews.com/videos/2014/11/12/317828/tRrwMt56uw.mp4

Bersiap untuk NaNoWriMo

John Green, penulis The Fault in Our Stars, pernah mengatakan dalam video Vlog Brothers
di YouTube bahwa menulis novel yang bagus dalam sebulan memang MUSYKIL. Kecuali Anda seorang jenius atau Anda orang kaya raya dan pemilik perusahaan penerbitan yang bisa seenaknya mencetak karya Anda yang paling kacangan dan picisan sekalipun untuk dipublikasikan, Anda pasti membutuhkan proses untuk membuat karya fiksi terbaik Anda.

Namun, demikian Greene yakin bahwa waktu sebulan itu cukup untuk menghasilkan sebuah draft pertama yang lumayan layak baca, meski nantinya tidak tertutup kemungkinan Anda bisa mengalami “pembantaian” habis-habisan oleh editor.

Karena itulah, saya menantang diri sendiri untuk bisa menghasilkan sebuah draft karya fiksi, entah itu novel atau novelet atau kumpulan cerpen dan saya akan memulai menulisnya sekarang.

Saya tidak akan peduli dengan pendapat orang karena saya hanya ingin menuliskannya untuk memuaskan diri sendiri dulu. Saya ingin menulis untuk menghasilkan karya yang saya ingin konsumsi sendiri, begitulah juga cara kerja Stephanie Meyer yang dikenal dengan Twilight Series-nya yang fenomenal. Egois kedengarannya, tetapi begitulah adanya.

Tulis dulu semuanya lalu sunting lagi untuk menyempurnakan.

Because writing is basically about rewriting….

Writing the Easiest Fiction is Much Harder than the Most Complex Non Fiction, Claims Ann Patchett

‎”Fiction is always really a labor. The hardest piece of non-fiction I ever wrote is NOT anywhere close to the easiest piece of fiction.”- Ann Patchett

As she talked about her non fiction work This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, Patchett also touched on this issue, which has become my problem, too. ‎She put it into words so effectively. No wonder, she is a great wordsmith.

Though she is more known for her fiction works, Patchett also wrote non fiction ones, which apparently are not so much read by the public. Here in her book, she dared to spill some personal intimate details of her own life.

She admitted she is fond of working as a magazine writer assigned to write non fiction pieces. This job enabled her to survive while pursuing her dream of becoming a successful novelist right in her twenties. It’s the best choice of all jobs, compared to being a waitress and a teacher. Being a writer of a magazine didn’t drain her physical energy‎ and made her much easier to write fiction works because there was more spare time left.

One thing that seems interesting to me is when she stated that her best piece of non fiction is much related to her most intimate private life details, like her stories on taking care of her grand mother, her marriage, etc. I guess that is because it is written with a heartfelt passion.

I as well am quite like her now. I work as a reporter, a job that makes me write 25 pieces of stories a single day (8 hours). Insanity? You bet. As challenging as it may seem, ‎I thank God because this way, I can afford my future fiction writing project.

Patchett is absolutely right about fiction writing. It is not merely about writing any imagination and wild and odd ideas ‎but more about creating a whole different world that resembles the world we live in. Because you still need to use logic after all while writing fiction works.

How about you? Do you think the same way, too?

This is How Jonathan Franzen Writes #writing

Jonathan Franzen on his writing process: Tone does matter.
Jonathan Franzen on his writing process: Tone does matter.
“It is such a huge question. I mean I really literally could talk all day and barely scratch the surface…

It’s always about TONE. If the tone is not there , then there’s no writing. And to get anything done, I need tone and a sense of outline. And the outline is much easier to get to the tone. I don’t have the heart to try to make an outline until I believe there is a piece of writing to be done and the piece of writing will exist as soon as I believe there is a tone to write it in.

A piece of writing is not interesting or worth doing if there is not some personal risks, if it is not dangerous in some fashion, whether your’re exposing some part of yourself you’d rather not talk about or whether it be being sincere about something that would be much comfortable to be ironic about and vice versa. If you’re being sarcastic or ironic about something that people people take seriously.

There can be some contempt risks. You don’t want to be seen writing such a thing or literally something somewhat obscene to do for journalists. But particularly if there is some elements of psychological risks, there is a discomfort. The first thing you have to know is: “Can I find the way to write about this uncomfortable thing that will not make people uncomfortable when they read it. And that distance is always navigated by way of a piece’s tone; do you like how you sound as you write about it or do you sound like a pompous asshole? And you cannot immediately know that but as soon as you start hearing, “Oh this I could read aloud and it would not kill me and yet people might simultaneously enjoy but also be slightly uncomfortable about it. That is where I wanna be.

And as you start hearing that by reading some paragraphs that you see,”Ok, I can read the whole thing in that voice and that will be OK”. At this point it is safe to make an outline and go on.

So that’s my process.” (As transcribed from a BIG THINK interview)

Write Freely, Edit Cruelly

“I find that discussing an idea before I’ve written it is often the best way to kill it stone-dead.” – J. K. Rowling

casual vacancy

Doesn’t it sound too obvious? I’ve known this since like… forever? Discussing about an idea with anybody else prior to writing it and push the wildest imagination to the point of exhaustion is such a foolish suicide committed by any novice writers, whether they be bloggers, fiction authors, non-fiction authors, or even creative web copywriters.

On writing Harry Potter, Rowling herself admitted that never did she let her drafts read by anyone else before getting done. Afterwards, she allowed only her editor (and maybe her husband, Neil Murray) to scrutinize the drafts. She stated this before the audience of the publication of “The Casual Vacancy”  at David H. Koch Theater.

That being said, I can directly relate that to myself who happens to be one of the haters of anything called “writers club” where several writers mingle and chat and discuss. That doesn’t particularly work for me. I feel like I was born free, so was my mind. So I need to free myself too while writing, setting aside any of those unwanted foreign influences (because some external influences are wanted to enrich ourselves).

Sounds too lenient uh? Wait until the editing comes. “Write freely, and edit cruelly,” that’s all I can say when you really want to produce a great piece of work for readers out there.