Two New Online Tools You Must Use to Combat Hoax

THERE is nothing I hate most nowadays but hoax. Fake news is so prevalent on social media that I recently deleted my Facebook personal account [though I am occasionally still on it for the sake of this blog’s presence].  I swear I never consume content through social media ever again. At least until the political situation is cooling down, which means after the next year’s Indonesian presidential election is over.

Good news is here now!

Two online weapons are already invented to eradicate fake news on the web.  By means of these tools, everyone can discover who initially spread the fake news in their circles. That way, we will easily find out who must be held responsible for any misinformation and later on blacklist these allegedly reckless and irresponsible accounts. So let’s check them out.

Once you enter the Twitter handle in the box at Hoaxy, you can see the analysis of a Twitter account [to find out if it’s a bot or not], its followers, and friends.

HOAXY

To find any culprits of fake news on Twitterverse, you can rely on Hoaxy. The open source tool presents you visualization of how online content gets spread and trackskinks published by two types of websites; i.e. low-credibility news outlets and independent fact-checking organizations. It can also detect bots or automated accounts. Hoaxy welcomes any feedbacks to improve their accuracy.

You can see the result of my own Twitter account in the above screen capture. And interestingly I can also detect all of my followers to know whether they are inclined to be bots or real accounts. Real accounts have lower scores [lower or around 1]; whereas, bots or automated accounts have higher scores [apporachig 5]. Twitter accounts with scores between 1-4 are allegedly using automation tools in some various extents regardless of the possibility if they are real people or bots.

Botometer is qite tricky to use if you are an occasional internet user because it is more technical and the interface is a bit more dull and rigid.

BOTOMETER

The next is Botometer. It assesses the degree of likelihood that an account on Twitter is in fact a bot. The higher the score gets, the higher as well the likelihood of being a bot is. To find bots around us is important because it helps to detect hoax. Hoax or fake news is usually spread by bots or automated accounts to give an impression that it is widely talked about by many people while in fact it is not at all. Botometer also serves us visualizations of scores.

Takeaway:

I definitely recommend using these online tools to stay sane in the Twitterverse amid these political events. But I do hope in the near future it is possible to use the tools  on Facebook and any other social media sites. For the time being, both have shown quite satisfactory  and reliable performance actually. (*/)