5 Essential Elements of Storytelling Travel Writers Should Never Miss

(Credit: Cecep)

TRAVELING is the best time for shopping! I mean, shopping of experiences, instead of goods. I am not an anti-materialism advocate in this case but I am hooked by the idea a thought leader said that “if you have money, buy experience. Don’t buy things.”

I guess that’s one of the root causes of why leisure economy is skyrocketting these days. It explains why suddenly working hard is no longer as cool as it used to be. Working smart (less sweat, more results) and going on vacation a lot is. This is understandable as more younger generations can see how flawed and unbalanced the lifestyle of their parents (babyboomers) who sacrifice their wellbeing in exchange of their financial stability.

So if you’re fond of traveling and really think that writing is also your best knack to earn a living (or simply another extra income), you may find the following points I elaborate here useful.

Here are some essential elements for you travel writers to bear in mind. Read on.

SETTING

As a travel writer or blogger, your main task is bring your audience from their mundane whereabouts (homes, offices, nursery homes, buses, commuter lines, etc) to a place you think they need to see, visit and enjoy fully.

Detailed, interesting and well-arranged description on places such as tourist attractions you just visited is one and the foremost element in travel writing that helps you attract readers. Details like these help form images in your readers’ brain. This vicarious thrill drags them to your world of experience without them being there as well.

Adjectives you may use have to vary. Cliches such as “beautiful”, “awesome”, and “gorgeous” can be avoided to keep boredom at bay. Instead of directly providing the entire verdict of your observation, let readers decide themselves by serving them details tourists usually miss on tours. Pay more attention to small things such as how fresh the air is, the condition, width and length of roads to get to the destination, etc.
But to add description only to your travel exposition is not enough.

INTERACTIONS

After a setting description that captures readers’ attention, you also ought to tell them what you do along the trip with people you run into and you travel with. Of course, you can set the line of privacy. Share only activities you feel comfortable enough to share without compromising your privacy. There are interactions that bring inspiration or positivity in the mind of readers. These are ones you need to add to your writing.

Describe interactions that occur naturally on your trip. As you observe, find out what is unique or inspiring or eye-opening or insightful from this. As a traveler, you’re also an anthropologist actually. You not only see and adore landscapes before you but also humans and interactions around you. This element – if carefully picked – can allow you to be an authentic storyteller.

No pretense. Just essence.

And interactions can comprise larger than ones with other humans. It can mean interactions with mother nature and – if you’re in the meditative, soul-searching mode – your own self or psyche. Along the trip, you make conversations with yourself. And because this is so cerebral and private, you need to divulge this in the form of writing.

NEW THINGS

Touristy places are nice but they won’t always give you new stuff to discover. If you can make a choice yourself, go to a place where very few tourists are willing to visit. Definitely, this may mean you have to sacrifice some degree of convenience. For example, when offered two options of route when hiking a hill, I could pick the shorter route with more even roads and treks. But I am also told that on a longer route, I could enjoy a better view, see more trees, and breathe in more fresh air. With my body ready to enjoy this trip to its fullest, I pick the longer route.

Also, add more history so readers know contexts of whatever place you visit. When was it built? Why was it founded? Who built it? Was there any background event or incident to accompany the description? It all enriches the travel writing you’re composing.

CONFLICTS

Like any other work of storytelling such as short stories, novellas and novels, your travel writing also needs to have its own central conflict. Don’t present too many. Concentrate on one single conflict so your writing is sharp and focused.

In additoon, choose a conflict that make people stick to your writing until its last paragraph.

CONTEMPLATION

This may be your self reflections. Add some certain things that might remind you of given pivotal moments in life. What comes from your journey can also evoke the similar emotion from readers as well. (*)

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